Simply put, we do three things: tutoring, mentoring and giving to our partner educational charity.

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Tutoring

We find the very best teachers and tutors across London and match them with students who need that little bit of extra help.

Whatever the age, if a student is struggling in a specific subject area, has ‘fallen-behind’ or needs a bit of one-to-one time to help understanding certain concepts then tutoring can do wonders to fill the gaps and and inspire self-belief in their school work.

Click below to see the range of tuition that we offer

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Mentoring

In certain situations we recommend having an academic mentor rather than a tutor.

Sometimes simply having a role model, to help build self-confidence and authorship can have a hugely positive impact on a child’s future.

The mentors that we place are always academically able in their subject area but have experience of mentoring students to achieve their very best.

Click below to find out more.

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Giving Back

For every £10 that our tutors and mentors make we give £1 directly to the UNESCO award winning educational charity See Beyond Borders.

Our donation is sent at the end of the month so it can have an immediate impact: providing teacher training in rural Cambodia and giving students the essential human right of a good education.

Click below to find out more.


What can you expect?

With London Bright Sparks you can guarantee the best educational support for the UK education system.

After you’ve contacted us you can expect the following:

  • A telephone consultation with our director of education: This helps us to get an understanding of your precise circumstances, and previous relevant educational experiences

  • An online pre-teaching questionnaire: This 10 minutes questionnaire gives you the chance to set expectations and necessary requirements for your chosen tutor or mentor.

  • We then create an online profile and search our database for a tutor/mentor who has all the required experience and skills to make a real difference to your child's learning.

  • We will then send you 2 or 3 CVs of the best candidates, and once you have picked your preferred option, we will arrange a free introductory tutorial/mentor meeting at a convenient time for you.

  • When the introductory tutorial/meeting is complete and you've had a chance to assess the compatibility and rapport of your child with your tutor/mentor, you are free to organise a regular schedule. If it's not quite the right fit, no problem, we will find a better option.

  • Reports are automatically sent to you from our system after each session is completed, and in-depth reports for extended feedback are delivered at the end of every term.

Tutors and mentors are also equipped with our handy 4 steps to a good education guide.

We give simple and effective advice to all tutors and mentors.

We always offer advice and guidance to tutors and mentors before tutors and mentors begin working with students. This is contained in our booklet London Bright Sparks: Four Steps to a very good education which we give to all new tutors and mentors after they have successfully interviewed with us. Read below to get an idea of what these Four Steps are and why we believe they are so important.

 
The most magical combination for a fully engaging learning process is a mix of natural curiosity and educational authorship

The most magical combination for a fully engaging learning process is a mix of natural curiosity and educational authorship

1. Encourage curiosity and educational ‘authorship’

Curiosity is a characteristic present in all people, young and (hopefully) old. This curiosity motivates learning above all else. If a child shows little curiosity to learn a particular topic, then this motor of learning must be fired up before all else begins.

If intrigue and curiosity drives the learning process, having authorship over the process allows longevity with learning. For some, this might come under the umbrella of a ‘student centred approach’.

One of the failings of the current results driven system is that students are spoon-fed information for them to repeat when they get into the exam hall.

When students finish school and enter into work, college or higher education, the spoon-feeding stops. Learning and intelligence isn’t measured by simple factual recall. Therefore, one of the most valuable dimensions of a student’s learning experience will not be what they learned, but understanding how they learned and having a desire to continue that process. In a world where technology is rapidly changing the world of work, and where students will probably have to retrain and re-learn several times over the course of their lives, this is immeasurably more valuable than any knowledge based account of intelligence (and let’s face it, we can now just google it anyway).

2. Developing a ‘Growth Mindset’

What do you see here, a mistake or a learning opportunity?

What do you see here, a mistake or a learning opportunity?

Presuming that you have a child who is curious and you are able to give them some degree of authorship over the learning process, the next important step is developing resilience and nurturing a ‘growth mindset’.

This is the theory, promoted by psychologist Dr Carol Dweck, that the most successful and happy individuals believe that ‘their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work’. This is in contrast to those who have a fixed mind-set: those who believe intelligence and talent to be inherent and unchanging.

The growth mind-set encourages a love of learning and a positive view of challenges that both students and adults face throughout their life. It also warns about offering praise to children for the wrong reasons.

Children should be praised for effort, dedication and work ethic, not for good scores in tests. For more information about the growth mind-set and Dr Dweck’s ideas go to Mind Set Works.

 
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3. Learning for Life

Difficulties in inspiring students are partly due to an inflexible focus on topics that are out-dated and irrelevant to the children, and partly to the difficulty involved in small numbers of teachers attempting to lead large numbers of independent, free-spirited children. All of our tutors encourage students to approach learning as a life-long pursuit 

We see wellbeing as a facilitator of academic success and recognise that academic ability is useful only for its capacity to produce happy, well-balanced individuals. We will always resist the prioritisation of academia and careerism over the nourishment of well-being.


The most vital lesson for a child to learn is that apparently impossible problems are solvable. By teaching a patient, systematic methodology and recognising good explanations the most difficult problems can be broken down and solved.

The most vital lesson for a child to learn is that apparently impossible problems are solvable. By teaching a patient, systematic methodology and recognising good explanations the most difficult problems can be broken down and solved.

4. Incremental Learning

Consider the experience of someone explaining something difficult to you, too quickly, not checking you are following, and without making sure that you already know enough to get started. This is an everyday experience for too many learners, and one that hugely inhibits potential. Difficult subject matter must only be presented when other necessary knowledge has already been well integrated. This allows students to flourish, and ensures that the experience is enjoyable.

Our programmes ensure that more fundamental concepts are taught and understood sufficiently before moving forward. When following this basic principle, the difference in a student's capacity for learning can be astounding.

Those have found a particular concept difficult at school will benefit from the Incremental Learning principles that ensure no challenge is prohibitively difficult. In fact, previously impossible maths can seem eerily straightforward. The high levels of satisfaction when tackling the original problem successfully are incredibly rewarding, triggering a change in the toxic relationship to study that many students develop.

 

Contact us today to arrange a free introductory tutorial